Saturday, February 11, 2012

Don't Treat Me Like a Fool

It's necessary to get political sometimes.

Usually that's something I leave to TheDad, because he's all into that sort of thing, and I figure that one politically-obsessed person in the household is enough.  I back off--to balance things out.

But that doesn't mean I don't notice.  And it doesn't mean I don't take action when action is necessary.

This is one of those times.

I listened to President Obama's self-congratulatory tone as he announced an "accommodation" to the HHS policy that would leave Catholic hospitals, universities and other institutions no choice but to offer health plans providing contraception, abortion-inducing drugs and sterilization procedures, all of which directly violate Catholic moral teaching.

I listened, and I realized that this "accommodation" makes things worse than it did before.  In the guise of making it LOOK like the Catholic employer would get to opt out, this plan requires that all insurance plans provide these, um, "services."

We all know that there's no free lunch.  We know that somebody's going to have to pay for it.  Ultimately, everybody's going to have to pay for it, because health-care costs will go up in order to pay for it, and that cost will be absorbed by employees.

Who knew that the President of the United States would borrow an argument more age-appropriate for his own children:  "Everybody does it."  99% of American women, he says, have used birth control during their reproductive years.

If that number is even true (and I haven't seen any proof that it is), that doesn't make it any less wrong.

With all due respect, Mr. Obama, would you buy that "everybody does it" line if your daughter used it on you?  Or would you answer, as parents have done for decades, "if everyone was jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge, would you do the same?"

If "everybody" decided to stop paying income taxes, you wouldn't think that "everybody does it" is a very good argument, now would you?

Don't treat me like a fool, Mr. President.  I can see what you're up to, and frankly, it terrifies me.

Jimmy Akin has an excellent analysis at the National Catholic Register.  Read the whole thing, and follow the "take action" link at the bottom.

Rocco Palmo has more on the American bishops' take on this "accommodation."

EVEN MORE:  Here's what the economists think.

4 comments:

Daria Sockey said...

Amen, Sister. I'm blogging about the same thing today. But mostly in terms of giving kudos to our bishops for not being taken in by the latest doublespeak.

Denise said...

I should have a very detailed article up at HLI in the next day or so. For now let me address the 99% number. It is from a CDC report. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CCgQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fnchs%2Fpressroom%2Fdata%2FContraception_Series_Report.pdf&ei=6uc2T5iWJam1sQLc5NmbAg&usg=AFQjCNGkHSgL7Gkm8a13AsmwGQBsOxSYvw

What this says is that 99% of American women use some form of contraception during their lifetime.Usage at any given moment is much lower. Now--get this--it includes the use of NFP! This is one of those "lies, damn lies, and statistics" moments.

Barb, ofs said...

Denise, thank you for the info on the statistic source.
Doublespeak, indeed. NFP is not "birth control."

Colleen said...

Thank you. I agree with you. Both on the fact that sometimes we have to get political. And the fact that this accommodation is just a change in semantics. The result is the same.